Category: Blog 

Please note our NEW Prescription Refill Policy:

Need a prescription refilled for any of your pets? Please read carefully, as our Policy has recently changed.

  • Refilling prescription medications requires authorization by your pet’s veterinarian (who may not be in the clinic all days of the week) and some medications need to be special-ordered.  As such we require at least two (2) business days notice for processing any refills.
  • Refills may be requested in person, over the phone (905-771-9855), or via email (reception@centrestreetanimalhospital.com)
  • When requesting a refill, please provide the exact name of the medication and the quantity requested.
  • Please check all of your pet’s medications, and submit as many refill requests at one time.

Tick Prevention For Ontario Residents

Learn what you can do today to protect your pets against tick-borne diseases

Did you know that Toronto is considered a high risk area for Lyme disease?

In Ontario, ticks have been implicated in the transmission of nearly a dozen human and animal infectious diseases, including lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and babesiosis. Ticks will attach onto your pet (or you) and bury their head in their host to feed on blood. They are active during any temperature above 0℃, meaning your pet is at risk of tick bites and infections almost year-round.

Tick activity is temperature-driven, not seasonal.

At Centre Street Animal Hospital, we normally recommend tick-preventative medication for 9 months of the year as ticks can be active as early as February and as late as December (adult ticks are most active in the spring and fall, and nymphs (younger ticks) prefer the warmer months of July/August).With the milder winters we’ve been experiencing, we are monitoring the tick activity closely each year, and year-round tick protection may become recommended in the near future.

The bottom line is – if it’s above freezing, both you and your pet should be protected from ticks, no matter what month of the year! This is why it is important to speak to your Veterinarian or veterinary technician about simple-to-use tick medications for your pet. There are now several choices available, and depending on their environment and risk, we can recommend the correct product for your pet’s individual needs. Determining the diseases present in your area, annual testing for these diseases, and taking extra precaution outdoors are also recommended.

How to check for ticks on your pets:

Ticks are becoming a growing concern here in Southern Ontario. They prefer damp humid environments and especially wooded or grassy areas, so precaution should be used when walking on trails, through leaf litter or near shrubs.

When the benefits greatly outweigh the risks.

As with any medication, there is a small chance of side-effects. All products in the isoxazoline class (tick & flea) have potential for neurological side-effects in dogs and cats. We are aware and attentive to the media surrounding this class of medications, however, it is important to also consider other contributing factors such as prior medical conditions, underlying disease, other medications used at the same time, and severe overdose. 

The FDA considers products in the isoxazoline class to be safe and effective for dogs and cats, and issued its safety communication so that pet owners and veterinarians can take it into consideration when choosing flea and tick products for their pets. We are 100% confident that the benefits of these medications vastly outweigh the very low risk of an adverse reaction. The well-being of our patients is incredibly important to us and we take great care in completing a proper examination and assessment to determine the most suitable course of treatment for your pets.

As a pet owner, you play an equal part in your pet’s healthcare, and we are here to educate and support you in every decision. Call us today to speak to our veterinary team about your pet’s current tick preventative regimen, or to arrange a visit to pick some up today. As always, we are here to help and answer any questions you may have.

Immunization Awareness!

What is a vaccine, and how does it work in the body?

A vaccine is a preparation that helps the body’s immune system get ready to fight disease-causing organisms. If the immune system has “seen” an unfamiliar microbe (bacteria or virus) as part of a vaccine, it’s primed to produce antibodies if it “sees” (i.e. is exposed to) the same microbe again. Antibodies are what help the body fight infection and protect it from getting the same illness again. Vaccinations are intended to reduce the severity of the disease, or prevent the disease entirely, by creating immunity. Although they are not 100% guaranteed prevention, they are your pet’s best bet for protection. 

Are they safe for my pet?

The general answer is yes. As with any medical procedure, there is a small chance of side effects; in most cases, these risks are much smaller than the risks of the disease itself. Common side effects can include soreness at the injection site, sluggishness, and eating or drinking less for 12-24 hours; but most pets experience no ill effects at all. Very rare side effects can include allergic or autoimmune reactions, but know that the risks are below 1%. Vaccines can provide potentially life-saving benefits, and are one of the easiest ways to help pets live a long and healthy life. If you have any concerns please don’t hesitate to reach out to us.

The most effective tool is prevention.

Vaccinations help protect pets from the risk of potentially serious and even fatal diseases. They not only cost considerably less than treatment, they are also far less stressful for pets and pet parents alike. Keeping your pet’s vaccines up to date is crucial for your pet’s well-being.

Vaccines are available to protect your pet against a wide variety of diseases. Although they are not yet able to eliminate or cure these diseases, vaccines for rabies, distemper, parvovirus, feline leukemia and panleukopenia have greatly reduced the incidences of disease – improving pet health and welfare, and preventing fatal outcomes.

Although it is considered non-core, our hospital has seen an increase in Leptospirosis cases over the past few years. We are encouraging pet owners to take new consideration into this vaccine if it is not part of their pet’s current vaccine protocol. 

Leptospirosis is caused by a bacteria that is found in soil and water, and can cause severe liver and kidney damage in the affected pet. In the Thornhill area, it is commonly passed through the urine of other mammals (raccoons, skunks, rodents), so it is very easy to contract in your local dog park or even your backyard. Unfortunately, Leptospirosis is often a difficult disease to diagnose as symptoms can be vague and can look like many other conditions before the disease progresses. Common early symptoms include vomiting, lethargy, depression, increased thirst, and fever. Leptospirosis is also a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be spread from animals to humans, so vaccination is one vital step needed to protect your pets and your family. Currently available vaccines will protect dogs for 12 months, so annual boosters are needed.

As a pet owner, you play an equal part in your pet’s healthcare, and we are here to educate and support you in every decision. Call us today to speak to our veterinary team about what specific vaccines your pet may need for their age and lifestyle. We are always here to help, and answer any questions you may have.

Welcoming Dr. Goldman to the CSAH Family!

We have some very exciting news!

We are pleased to welcome our newest Veterinarian to Centre Street Animal Hospital, Dr. Kineret Aloni-Goldman BSc, DVM. She comes to us from Milliken-Bridlewood Animal Clinic, but is no stranger to Centre Street Animal Hospital. Dr. Goldman has been an interim veterinarian in our clinic for over 10 years, and now she is officially joining us as a part-time doctor! If you would like to say hello, drop in anytime on Mondays or Wednesdays and join us in welcoming her to the CSAH Family!

Bio: Ever since she can remember, Dr. Goldman wanted to be a veterinarian. While growing up in Israel, she was actively involved in rehabilitating stray dogs and helping them find their forever homes. She earned her veterinary degree from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph in 2009, and her Bachelor of Science in Biology from York University. She also volunteered with a spay and neuter clinic in Thailand while in vet school. Before joining Centre Street Animal Hospital as a part-time veterinarian in June 2019, Dr. Goldman worked at several hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area. Her professional interests include surgery, internal medicine, preventative medicine and geriatrics. When not in the clinic, she works as a part-time shelter veterinarian and a surgeon for Toronto Animal Services. Outside of work, Dr. Goldman enjoys spending time in North York where she lives with her husband, three kids, and their rescue dog named Roy.

Grain-Free Diets: The Emerging Truth

The issue around grain-free pet foods has been growing this year, with scientists studying the effects of certain diets that may be linked to fatal canine heart disease. While this information is still under review, we thought it was important to share the data so you can be aware and make informed decisions about your pet’s diet and overall health.

The FDA has been collecting data on the potential connection between certain diets linked to 515 cases of the disease. Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy, a disease of a dog’s heart muscle, can often result in congestive heart failure. We typically see larger breeds such as Dobermans and Great Danes affected by DCM, however many cases are now showing in smaller breeds, which suggests a lack of a genetic connection.

The agency defines “grain-free” as not containing corn, soy, wheat, rice, barley or other grains. Of the dog-food brands on the FDA’s list, 91% of the products investigated were labelled grain-free.

In its latest report, the FDA said it does not yet know how certain diets may be associated with DCM in dogs. The agency is encouraging pet owners to work directly with veterinarians or board-certified veterinary nutritionists to choose an appropriate diet for their pets. Pet owners should continue to report cases of dogs and cats with DCM that could be linked to diet. To report, use the online Safety Reporting Portal.

To summarize, this serves to illustrate the importance of feeding properly researched and well-balanced diets. Looking for the AAFCO statement, and ensuring the food has undergone feeding trials, can help in making educated decisions. Unfortunately, there are still no regulations in Canada within the pet food industry, meaning new companies can pop up all the time, so it is crucial that you be the advocate for your pet.

If you are feeding one of these brands to your pet, simply check to see if it is a “grain-free” version, and if so, look for another option. If you have any further questions or concerns, we are simply a phone call away. Feel free to contact us at 905-771-9855 to speak with one of our staff members, we are always here for you and your pet.


Tips from Dr. Slome: 
Click to hear our veterinarian’s top tips on choosing the right food for your pet.
  • Please note our NEW Prescription Refill Policy:

    Need a prescription refilled for any of your pets? Please read carefully, as our Policy has recently changed. Refilling prescription medications requires authorization by your pet’s veterinarian (who may not be in the clinic all days of the week) and some medications need to be special-ordered.  As such we require at least two (2) business days notice for processing any ...

    Read more →
  • Tick Prevention For Ontario Residents

    Learn what you can do today to protect your pets against tick-borne diseases Did you know that Toronto is considered a high risk area for Lyme disease? In Ontario, ticks have been implicated in the transmission of nearly a dozen human and animal infectious diseases, including lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and babesiosis. Ticks will attach onto your pet (or you) ...

    Read more →
  • Immunization Awareness!

    What is a vaccine, and how does it work in the body? A vaccine is a preparation that helps the body’s immune system get ready to fight disease-causing organisms. If the immune system has “seen” an unfamiliar microbe (bacteria or virus) as part of a vaccine, it’s primed to produce antibodies if it “sees” (i.e. is exposed to) the same ...

    Read more →